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The '''Higgs field''' is a [[scalar field|scalar]] [[field (physics)|field]], with two neutral and two electrically charged components that form a complex [[doublet (physics)|doublet]] of the [[weak isospin]] [[SU(2)]] symmetry. Its "[[Spontaneous symmetry breaking#Mexican hat potential|Mexican hat-shaped]]" potential has a nonzero value ''everywhere'' (including otherwise empty space), which [[spontaneous symmetry breaking|breaks]] the [[weak isospin]] symmetry of the [[electroweak interaction]], and via the [[Higgs mechanism]] gives some particles mass.
The '''Higgs field''' is a [[scalar field|scalar]] [[field (physics)|field]], with two neutral and two electrically charged components that form a complex [[doublet (physics)|doublet]] of the [[weak isospin]] [[SU(2)]] symmetry. Its "[[Spontaneous symmetry breaking#Mexican hat potential|Mexican hat-shaped]]" potential has a nonzero value ''everywhere'' (including otherwise empty space), which [[spontaneous symmetry breaking|breaks]] the [[weak isospin]] symmetry of the [[electroweak interaction]], and via the [[Higgs mechanism]] gives some particles mass.


Both the field and the boson are named after physicist [[Peter Higgs]], who in 1964 [[1964 PRL symmetry breaking papers|along with five other scientists]] in three teams, proposed the [[Higgs mechanism]], a way that [[mass generation|some particles can acquire mass]]. (Fundamental particles should be massless at very high energies, but fully explaining how all particles gain mass at lower energies, had been extremely difficult.) If these ideas were correct, a particle known as a scalar [[boson]] should also exist, with certain properties. This particle was called the Higgs boson, and could be used to test whether the Higgs field was the correct explanation.
Both the field and the boson are named after physicist [[Peter Higgs]], who in 1964 [[1964 PRL symmetry breaking papers|along with five other scientists]] in three teams, proposed the [[Higgs mechanism]], a way that [[mass generation|some particles can acquire mass]]. (Fundamental particles should be massless at very high energies, but fully explaining how some particles gain mass at lower energies, had been extremely difficult.) If these ideas were correct, a particle known as a scalar [[boson]] should also exist, with certain properties. This particle was called the Higgs boson, and could be used to test whether the Higgs field was the correct explanation.


After a [[Search for the Higgs boson|40 year search]], a subatomic particle with the expected properties was discovered in 2012 by the [[ATLAS experiment|ATLAS]] and [[Compact Muon Solenoid|CMS]] experiments at the [[Large Hadron Collider]] (LHC) at [[CERN]] near [[Geneva]], Switzerland. The new particle was subsequently confirmed to match the expected properties of a Higgs boson. Physicists from two of the three teams, Peter Higgs and [[François Englert]], were awarded the [[Nobel Prize in Physics]] in 2013 for their theoretical predictions. Although Higgs's name has come to be associated with this theory, several researchers between about 1960 and 1972 independently developed different parts of it.
After a [[Search for the Higgs boson|40 year search]], a subatomic particle with the expected properties was discovered in 2012 by the [[ATLAS experiment|ATLAS]] and [[Compact Muon Solenoid|CMS]] experiments at the [[Large Hadron Collider]] (LHC) at [[CERN]] near [[Geneva]], Switzerland. The new particle was subsequently confirmed to match the expected properties of a Higgs boson. Physicists from two of the three teams, Peter Higgs and [[François Englert]], were awarded the [[Nobel Prize in Physics]] in 2013 for their theoretical predictions. Although Higgs's name has come to be associated with this theory, several researchers between about 1960 and 1972 independently developed different parts of it.
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