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"A place had to be created for the sort of 'king's mother' Margaret was determined to be. Perhaps if Margaret had become a queen, a role that she clearly felt Fortune had denied her, she would not have felt the need to press for her rights quite so stridently."<ref>{{Cite book|last=Gristwood|first=Sarah|title=Blood Sisters: The Women Behind the Wars of the Roses|publisher=Basic Books|year=2013|location=New York|pages=258}}</ref>
"A place had to be created for the sort of 'king's mother' Margaret was determined to be. Perhaps if Margaret had become a queen, a role that she clearly felt Fortune had denied her, she would not have felt the need to press for her rights quite so stridently."<ref>{{Cite book|last=Gristwood|first=Sarah|title=Blood Sisters: The Women Behind the Wars of the Roses|publisher=Basic Books|year=2013|location=New York|pages=258}}</ref>


Lady Margaret's immediate petitions were not for queenly powers of rule over others, but were two succinct demands for independence and liberty of self, which were products of expert legal advice, as opposed to a desperate desire to rule.<ref name="Jones 1992 99">{{Cite book|last=Jones|first=Michael K.|title=The King's Mother: Lady Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond and Derby|publisher=Cambridge University Press|year=1992|location=New York|pages=99}}</ref>
However, Lady Margaret's immediate petitions were not for queenly powers of rule over others, but were two succinct demands for independence and liberty of self, which were products of expert legal advice, as opposed to a desperate desire to rule.<ref name="Jones 1992 99">{{Cite book|last=Jones|first=Michael K.|title=The King's Mother: Lady Margaret Beaufort, Countess of Richmond and Derby|publisher=Cambridge University Press|year=1992|location=New York|pages=99}}</ref>


The first Act reversed the legislation that had robbed Margaret of her properties under the reign of Richard III, deeming it "entirely void, annulled and of no force or effect".<ref>{{Cite book|title=The Parliament Rolls of Medieval England|publisher=The Boydell Press|year=2005|location=Woodbridge, London|pages=126–7}}</ref><ref name="Jones 1992 99"/> The second Act of November 1485 stated that she would enjoy all her properties and titles, and could pursue any legal action as any "single unmarried person might or may do at any time", despite still being married.<ref>{{Cite book|title=The Parliament Rolls of Medieval England|publisher=The Boydell Press |year=2005|location=Woodbridge, London|pages=126–7}}</ref>
The first Act reversed the legislation that had robbed Margaret of her properties under the reign of Richard III, deeming it "entirely void, annulled and of no force or effect".<ref>{{Cite book|title=The Parliament Rolls of Medieval England|publisher=The Boydell Press|year=2005|location=Woodbridge, London|pages=126–7}}</ref><ref name="Jones 1992 99"/> The second Act of November 1485 stated that she would enjoy all her properties and titles, and could pursue any legal action as any "single unmarried person might or may do at any time", despite still being married.<ref>{{Cite book|title=The Parliament Rolls of Medieval England|publisher=The Boydell Press |year=2005|location=Woodbridge, London|pages=126–7}}</ref>
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/* Margaret Beaufort in power */
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