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===18th century, the American Revolution, and statehood===
===18th century, the American Revolution, and statehood===


The [[Sons of Liberty]] were organized in [[New York City]] during the 1760s, largely in response to the oppressive [[Stamp Act 1765|Stamp Act]] passed by the [[Parliament of the United Kingdom|British Parliament]] in 1765.<ref>{{Cite web|last=Kiger|first=Patrick J.|date=|title=Who Were the Sons of Liberty?|url=https://www.history.com/news/sons-of-liberty-members-causes|url-status=live|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20210126231541/https://www.history.com/news/sons-of-liberty-members-causes|archive-date=January 26, 2021|access-date=February 2, 2021|website=History}}</ref> The [[Stamp Act Congress]] met in the city on October 19 of that year, composed of representatives from across the [[Thirteen Colonies]] who set the stage for the [[Continental Congress]] to follow. The Stamp Act Congress resulted in the [[Declaration of Rights and Grievances]], which was the first written expression by representatives of the Americans of many of the rights and complaints later expressed in the [[United States Declaration of Independence]]. This included the right to [[No taxation without representation|representative government]]. At the same time, given strong commercial, personal and sentimental links to [[Kingdom of Great Britain|Britain]], many New York residents were [[Loyalist]]s. The [[Capture of Fort Ticonderoga]] provided the [[Fortification of Dorchester Heights|cannon and gunpowder]] necessary to force a [[Kingdom of Great Britain|British]] withdrawal from the [[Siege of Boston]] in 1775.
The [[Sons of Liberty]] were organized in [[New York City]] during the 1760s, largely in response to the oppressive [[Stamp Act 1765|Stamp Act]] passed by the [[Parliament of the United Kingdom|British Parliament]] in 1765.<ref>{{Cite web|last=Kiger|first=Patrick J.|date=|title=Who Were the Sons of Liberty?|url=https://www.history.com/news/sons-of-liberty-members-causes|url-status=live|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20210126231541/https://www.history.com/news/sons-of-liberty-members-causes|archive-date=January 26, 2021|access-date=February 2, 2021|website=History}}</ref> The [[Stamp Act Congress]] met in the city on October 19 of that year, composed of representatives from across the [[Thirteen Colonies]] who set the stage for the [[Continental Congress]] to follow. The Stamp Act Congress resulted in the [[Declaration of Rights and Grievances]], which was the first written expression by representatives of the Americans of many of the rights and complaints later expressed in the [[United States Declaration of Independence]]. This included the right to [[No taxation without representation|representative government]]. At the same time, given strong commercial, personal and sentimental links to [[Kingdom of Great Britain|Britain]], many New York residents were [[Loyalist]]s. The [[Capture of Fort Ticonderoga]] provided the [[Fortification of Dorchester Heights|cannon and gunpowder]] necessary to force a [[Kingdom of Great Britain|British]] withdrawal from the [[siege of Boston]] in 1775.


New York was the only colony [[United States Declaration of Independence#Draft and adoption|not to vote for independence]], as the delegates were not authorized to do so. New York then endorsed the [[United States Declaration of Independence|Declaration of Independence]] on July 9, 1776.<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.history.com/minisites/fourthofjuly/viewPage?pageId=690 |title=Declaration of Independence |publisher=history.com |access-date=April 10, 2008|archive-url = https://web.archive.org/web/20080409165028/http://www.history.com/minisites/fourthofjuly/viewPage%3FpageId%3D690 |archive-date=April 9, 2008|url-status=dead}}</ref> The [[New York Constitution|New York State Constitution]] was framed by a [[Constitutional convention (political meeting)|convention]] which assembled at [[White Plains, New York|White Plains]] on July 10, 1776, and after repeated adjournments and changes of location, finished its work at [[Kingston, New York|Kingston]] on Sunday evening, April 20, 1777, when the [[Constitution of New York, 1777|new constitution]] drafted by [[John Jay]] was adopted with but one dissenting vote. It was not submitted to the people for ratification. On July 30, 1777, [[George Clinton (vice president)|George Clinton]] was inaugurated as the first [[Governor of New York]] at Kingston.<ref>{{Cite web|title=NYS Kids Room – State History|url=https://www.dos.ny.gov/kids_room/508/history2.html|url-status=live|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20201020105914/https://www.dos.ny.gov/kids_room/508/history2.html|archive-date=October 20, 2020|access-date=February 2, 2021|website=[[New York State Department of State]]}}</ref>
New York was the only colony [[United States Declaration of Independence#Draft and adoption|not to vote for independence]], as the delegates were not authorized to do so. New York then endorsed the [[United States Declaration of Independence|Declaration of Independence]] on July 9, 1776.<ref>{{cite web |url=http://www.history.com/minisites/fourthofjuly/viewPage?pageId=690 |title=Declaration of Independence |publisher=history.com |access-date=April 10, 2008|archive-url = https://web.archive.org/web/20080409165028/http://www.history.com/minisites/fourthofjuly/viewPage%3FpageId%3D690 |archive-date=April 9, 2008|url-status=dead}}</ref> The [[New York Constitution|New York State Constitution]] was framed by a [[Constitutional convention (political meeting)|convention]] which assembled at [[White Plains, New York|White Plains]] on July 10, 1776, and after repeated adjournments and changes of location, finished its work at [[Kingston, New York|Kingston]] on Sunday evening, April 20, 1777, when the [[Constitution of New York, 1777|new constitution]] drafted by [[John Jay]] was adopted with but one dissenting vote. It was not submitted to the people for ratification. On July 30, 1777, [[George Clinton (vice president)|George Clinton]] was inaugurated as the first [[Governor of New York]] at Kingston.<ref>{{Cite web|title=NYS Kids Room – State History|url=https://www.dos.ny.gov/kids_room/508/history2.html|url-status=live|archive-url=https://web.archive.org/web/20201020105914/https://www.dos.ny.gov/kids_room/508/history2.html|archive-date=October 20, 2020|access-date=February 2, 2021|website=[[New York State Department of State]]}}</ref>
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