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[[File:Didgeridu and clap sticks.jpg|thumb|Didgeridoo and [[clapstick]] players performing at [[Nightcliff, Northern Territory]]]]
 
[[File:Didgeridu and clap sticks.jpg|thumb|Didgeridoo and [[clapstick]] players performing at [[Nightcliff, Northern Territory]]]]
 
[[File:Didgeridoo sound.ogg|thumb|Sound of Didgeridoo]]
 
[[File:Didgeridoo sound.ogg|thumb|Sound of Didgeridoo]]
The '''didgeridoo''' ({{IPAc-en|ˌ|d|ɪ|dʒ|ər|i|ˈ|d|uː}}; also spelt '''didjeridu''', among other variants) is a [[wind instrument]], played with continuously vibrating lips to produce a continuous drone while using a special breathing technique called [[circular breathing]]. The didgeridoo was developed by [[Aboriginal Australians|Aboriginal peoples]] of northern Australia at least 1,500 years ago, and is now in use around the world, though still most strongly associated with [[Indigenous Australian music]]. The [[Yolŋu languages|Yolŋu]] name for the instrument is the '''''yiḏaki''''', or more recently by some, '''''mandapul'''''; in the [[Bininj Gun-Wok|Bininj Kunwok]] language of West Arnhem Land it is known as '''''mako'''''.<ref>{{cite web |last1=Garde |first1=Murray |title=Bininj Kunwok Online Dictionary |url=https://www.njamed.com/#mako |website=njamed.com |publisher=Bininj Kunwok Regional Language Centre |access-date=12 August 2020}}</ref>
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The '''didgeridoo''' ({{IPAc-en|ˌ|d|ɪ|dʒ|ər|i|ˈ|d|uː}}; also spelt '''didjeridu''', among other variants) is a [[wind instrument]], played with continuously vibrating lips to produce a continuous drone while using a special breathing technique called [[circular breathing]]. The didgeridoo was developed by [[Aboriginal Australians|Aboriginal peoples]] of northern Australia over 40,000 years ago, and is now in use around the world, though still most strongly associated with [[Indigenous Australian music]]. The [[Yolŋu languages|Yolŋu]] name for the instrument is the '''''yiḏaki''''', or more recently by some, '''''mandapul'''''; in the [[Bininj Gun-Wok|Bininj Kunwok]] language of West Arnhem Land it is known as '''''mako'''''.<ref>{{cite web |last1=Garde |first1=Murray |title=Bininj Kunwok Online Dictionary |url=https://www.njamed.com/#mako |website=njamed.com |publisher=Bininj Kunwok Regional Language Centre |access-date=12 August 2020}}</ref>
   
 
A didgeridoo is usually [[cylindrical]] or [[Cone (geometry)|conical]], and can measure anywhere from {{convert|1|to|3|m|ft|0|abbr=on}} long. Most are around {{convert|1.2|m|ft|0|abbr=on}} long. Generally, the longer the instrument, the lower its pitch or key. However, flared instruments play a higher pitch than unflared instruments of the same length.
 
A didgeridoo is usually [[cylindrical]] or [[Cone (geometry)|conical]], and can measure anywhere from {{convert|1|to|3|m|ft|0|abbr=on}} long. Most are around {{convert|1.2|m|ft|0|abbr=on}} long. Generally, the longer the instrument, the lower its pitch or key. However, flared instruments play a higher pitch than unflared instruments of the same length.
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