direct-revision feed
edited:
Author: DavidWBrooks
Diff View
Original wikitext
Changed wikitext
Line 145: Line 145:
   
 
==In popular culture==
 
==In popular culture==
Modern performances using the didgeridoo include combining it with [[beatboxing]]. It was featured on the British children's TV series ''[[Blue Peter]]''.<ref>{{cite news|url=https://www.bbc.co.uk/learningzone/clips/didgeridoo-beat-boxing/10171.html|title=Didgeridoo Beat-boxing|publisher=[[BBC]]|work=[[Blue Peter]]|access-date=31 July 2013}}</ref>
 
   
The didgeridoo also became a role playing instrument in the experimental and avant-garde music scene. [[Industrial music]] bands like [[Test Dept]] generated sounds from this instrument and used them in their performances.
 
   
 
[[Charlie McMahon]], who formed the group [[Gondwanaland (band)|Gondwanaland]], was one of the first non-Aboriginal players to gain fame as a professional didgeridoo player. He has toured internationally with [[Midnight Oil]]. He invented the didjeribone, a sliding didgeridoo made from two lengths of plastic tubing; its playing style is somewhat in the manner of a [[trombone]].
It is very often used in the music project Naakhum which combines Extreme Metal and Ethnic music.
 
   
  +
The didgeridoo has been used by a number of modern bands in various types of music. Some examples include:
Early songs by the acid jazz band [[Jamiroquai]] featured didgeridoo player Wallis Buchanan (until he left the band in 1999). A notable song featuring a didgeridoo is the band's first single "[[When You Gonna Learn]]", which features prominent didgeridoo playing in both the introduction and solo sections.
 
   
 
It was featured on the British children's TV series ''[[Blue Peter]]''.<ref>{{cite news|url=https://www.bbc.co.uk/learningzone/clips/didgeridoo-beat-boxing/10171.html|title=Didgeridoo Beat-boxing|publisher=[[BBC]]|work=[[Blue Peter]]|access-date=31 July 2013}}</ref>
The instrument is commonly used by ambient artist [[Steve Roach (musician)|Steve Roach]] as a complement to his produced soundscapes, in both live and recorded formats. It features prominently in his collaborative work ''[[Australia: Sound of the Earth]]'' (with Australian Aboriginal artist [[David Hudson (musician)|David Hudson]] and cellist Sarah Hopkins) as well as ''Dreamtime Return''.
 
   
  +
[[Industrial music]] bands like [[Test Dept]].
It is used in the Indian song "[[Jaane Kyon]]" from the film ''[[Dil Chahta Hai]]''.
 
   
Chris Brooks, lead singer of the New Zealand [[hard rock]] band [[Like a Storm]] uses the didgeridoo in some of the band's songs including "Love the Way You Hate Me" from their album ''[[Chaos Theory: Part 1]]''.
+
Early songs by the acid jazz band [[Jamiroquai]] featured didgeridoo player Wallis Buchanan, including the band's first single "[[When You Gonna Learn]]", which features prominent didgeridoo in the introduction and solo sections.
   
 
Ambient artist [[Steve Roach (musician)|Steve Roach]] uses it in his collaborative work ''[[Australia: Sound of the Earth]]'' with Australian Aboriginal artist [[David Hudson (musician)|David Hudson]] and cellist Sarah Hopkins, as well as ''Dreamtime Return''.
[[Kate Bush]] made extensive use of the didgeridoo (played by Australian musician [[Rolf Harris]]) on her album ''[[The Dreaming (album)|The Dreaming]]'', which was written and recorded after a holiday in Australia.
 
   
 
It is used in the Indian song "[[Jaane Kyon]]" from the film ''[[Dil Chahta Hai]]''.
[[Charlie McMahon]], who formed the group [[Gondwanaland (band)|Gondwanaland]], was one of the first non-Aboriginal players to gain fame as a professional didgeridoo player. He has toured internationally with [[Midnight Oil]]. He invented the didjeribone, a sliding didgeridoo made from two lengths of plastic tubing; its playing style is somewhat in the manner of a [[trombone]].
 
  +
  +
Chris Brooks, lead singer of the New Zealand [[hard rock]] band [[Like a Storm]] uses the didgeridoo in some songs including "Love the Way You Hate Me" from their album ''[[Chaos Theory: Part 1]]''.
  +
 
[[Kate Bush]] made extensive use of the didgeridoo played by Australian musician [[Rolf Harris]] on her album ''[[The Dreaming (album)|The Dreaming]]'', which was written and recorded after a holiday in Australia.
   
 
==Cultural significance==
 
==Cultural significance==
Edit summary
tighten the pop culture section, which could use more editing
Human editors:
Artificial Intelligence: