direct-revision feed
edited:
Author: Jaredscribe
Diff View
Original wikitext
Changed wikitext
Line 29: Line 29:
 
;Chapter One: Aristotle first defines rhetoric as the counterpart (''[[antistrophe]]'') of [[dialectic]] (Book 1:1:1–2). He explains the similarities between the two but fails to comment on the differences. Here he introduces the term [[enthymeme]] (Book 1:1:3).
 
;Chapter One: Aristotle first defines rhetoric as the counterpart (''[[antistrophe]]'') of [[dialectic]] (Book 1:1:1–2). He explains the similarities between the two but fails to comment on the differences. Here he introduces the term [[enthymeme]] (Book 1:1:3).
   
;Chapter Two: Aristotle's famous definition of rhetoric is viewed as the ability in any particular case to see the available means of persuasion. He defines ''[[Pistis|pisteis]]'' (plural of {{lang|grc|[[wikt:πίστις|πῐ́στῐς]]}}, {{transl|grc|pístis}}, {{Literal translation|'trust in others, [[faith]]; means of persuasion'|lk=on}}) as atechnic (inartistic) and entechnic (artistic). Of the ''pisteis'' provided through speech there are three parts: ''ethos'', ''pathos'', and ''logos''. He introduces paradigms and [[syllogism]]s as means of persuasion.
+
;Chapter Two: Aristotle's famous definition of rhetoric is viewed as the ability in any particular case to see the available means of persuasion. He defines ''[[Pistis|pisteis]]'' (plural of {{lang|grc|[[wikt:πίστις|πῐ́στῐς]]}}, {{transl|grc|pístis}}, {{Literal translation|'trust in others, [[faith]]; means of persuasion'|lk=on}}) as atechnic (inartistic) and entechnic (artistic). Of the ''pisteis'' provided through speech there are three parts: ''ethos'', ''pathos'', and ''logos''. He introduces [[paradigm]]<nowiki/>s and [[syllogism]]s as means of persuasion.
   
 
;Chapter Three: Introduces the three genres of rhetoric: [[Deliberative rhetoric|deliberative]], [[Forensic rhetoric|forensic]], and [[Epideictic|epideictic rhetoric]]. Here he also touches on the "ends" the orators of each of these genres hope to reach with their persuasions—which are discussed in further detail in later chapters (Book 1:3:5–7). Aristotle introduces these three genres by saying that "[t]he kinds of rhetoric are three in number, corresponding to the three kinds of hearers".<ref>{{cite journal | title = Aristotle on the Kinds of Rhetoric | journal = Rhetorica: A Journal of the History of Rhetoric | first = Eugene | last = Garver | volume = 27 | issue = 1 | pages = 1–18 | doi=10.1525/rh.2009.27.1.1}}</ref><ref>{{cite journal | title = Aristotle on the Kinds of Rhetoric | journal = International Society for the History of Rhetoric | date = Winter 2009 | first = Eugene | last = Garver | volume = 27 | issue = 1 | pages = 1–18 | doi=10.1525/rh.2009.27.1.1}}</ref>
 
;Chapter Three: Introduces the three genres of rhetoric: [[Deliberative rhetoric|deliberative]], [[Forensic rhetoric|forensic]], and [[Epideictic|epideictic rhetoric]]. Here he also touches on the "ends" the orators of each of these genres hope to reach with their persuasions—which are discussed in further detail in later chapters (Book 1:3:5–7). Aristotle introduces these three genres by saying that "[t]he kinds of rhetoric are three in number, corresponding to the three kinds of hearers".<ref>{{cite journal | title = Aristotle on the Kinds of Rhetoric | journal = Rhetorica: A Journal of the History of Rhetoric | first = Eugene | last = Garver | volume = 27 | issue = 1 | pages = 1–18 | doi=10.1525/rh.2009.27.1.1}}</ref><ref>{{cite journal | title = Aristotle on the Kinds of Rhetoric | journal = International Society for the History of Rhetoric | date = Winter 2009 | first = Eugene | last = Garver | volume = 27 | issue = 1 | pages = 1–18 | doi=10.1525/rh.2009.27.1.1}}</ref>
Edit summary
/* Overview of Book I */ [[Paradigm]]
Human editors:
Artificial Intelligence: