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More radio-friendly singles followed from Santana and the band. "Winning" in 1981 (from ''[[Zebop!]]'') and "Hold On" (a remake of the Canadian artist [[Ian Thomas (Canadian musician)|Ian Thomas]]' song) in 1982 both reached the top twenty. After his break with Sri Chinmoy, Santana went into the studio to record another solo album with Keith Olson and legendary R&B producer [[Jerry Wexler]]. The 1983 album ''[[Havana Moon]]'' revisited Santana's early musical experiences in Tijuana with [[Bo Diddley]]'s "[[Who Do You Love? (Bo Diddley song)|Who Do You Love]]" and the title cut, [[Chuck Berry]]'s "Havana Moon". The album's guests included [[Booker T. Jones]], [[the Fabulous Thunderbirds]], [[Willie Nelson]], and even Santana's father's [[mariachi]] orchestra. Santana again paid tribute to his early rock roots by doing the film score to ''[[La Bamba (film)|La Bamba]]'', which was based on the life of rock and roll legend [[Ritchie Valens]] and starred [[Lou Diamond Phillips]].
More radio-friendly singles followed from Santana and the band. "Winning" in 1981 (from ''[[Zebop!]]'') and "Hold On" (a remake of the Canadian artist [[Ian Thomas (Canadian musician)|Ian Thomas]]' song) in 1982 both reached the top twenty. After his break with Sri Chinmoy, Santana went into the studio to record another solo album with Keith Olson and legendary R&B producer [[Jerry Wexler]]. The 1983 album ''[[Havana Moon]]'' revisited Santana's early musical experiences in Tijuana with [[Bo Diddley]]'s "[[Who Do You Love? (Bo Diddley song)|Who Do You Love]]" and the title cut, [[Chuck Berry]]'s "Havana Moon". The album's guests included [[Booker T. Jones]], [[the Fabulous Thunderbirds]], [[Willie Nelson]], and even Santana's father's [[mariachi]] orchestra. Santana again paid tribute to his early rock roots by doing the film score to ''[[La Bamba (film)|La Bamba]]'', which was based on the life of rock and roll legend [[Ritchie Valens]] and starred [[Lou Diamond Phillips]].


The band ''Santana'' returned in 1985 with a new album, ''[[Beyond Appearances]]'', and two years later with ''[[Freedom (Santana album)|Freedom]]''.
The band ''Santana'' returned in 1985 with a new album, ''[[Beyond Appearances]]'', and two years later with ''[[Freedom (Santana album)|Freedom]]''. Freedom is the fifteenth studio album by Santana. By this recording, Santana had nine members, some of whom had returned after being with the band in previous versions, including lead singer on the album Buddy Miles. Freedom moved away from the more poppy sound of the previous album, Beyond Appearances and back to the band's original Latin rock.


Growing weary of trying to appease record company executives with formulaic hit records, Santana took great pleasure in jamming and making guest appearances with notables such as the jazz fusion group [[Weather Report]], jazz pianist [[McCoy Tyner]], Blues legend [[John Lee Hooker]], Frank Franklin, [[Living Colour]] guitarist [[Vernon Reid]], and West African singer [[Salif Keita]]. He and [[Mickey Hart]] of the [[Grateful Dead]] later recorded and performed with Nigerian drummer [[Babatunde Olatunji]], who conceived one of Santana's famous 1960s drum jams, "[[Drums of Passion#"Jin-Go-Lo-Ba"|Jingo]]". In 1988, Santana organized a reunion with past members from the Santana band for a [[Viva Santana! Tour|series of concert dates]]. CBS records released a 20-year retrospective of the band's accomplishments with ''[[Viva Santana!]]'' double CD compilation. That same year, Santana formed an all-instrumental group featuring jazz legend [[Wayne Shorter]] on tenor and soprano saxophone. The group also included [[Patrice Rushen]] on keyboards, [[Alphonso Johnson]] on bass, [[Armando Peraza]] and Chepito Areas on percussion, and [[Leon "Ndugu" Chancler]] on drums. They toured briefly and received much acclaim from the music press, who compared the effort with the era of ''Caravanserai'' (1972). Santana released another solo record, ''[[Blues for Salvador]]'' (1987), which won a [[Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance]].
Growing weary of trying to appease record company executives with formulaic hit records, Santana took great pleasure in jamming and making guest appearances with notables such as the jazz fusion group [[Weather Report]], jazz pianist [[McCoy Tyner]], Blues legend [[John Lee Hooker]], Frank Franklin, [[Living Colour]] guitarist [[Vernon Reid]], and West African singer [[Salif Keita]]. He and [[Mickey Hart]] of the [[Grateful Dead]] later recorded and performed with Nigerian drummer [[Babatunde Olatunji]], who conceived one of Santana's famous 1960s drum jams, "[[Drums of Passion#"Jin-Go-Lo-Ba"|Jingo]]". In 1988, Santana organized a reunion with past members from the Santana band for a [[Viva Santana! Tour|series of concert dates]]. CBS records released a 20-year retrospective of the band's accomplishments with ''[[Viva Santana!]]'' double CD compilation. That same year, Santana formed an all-instrumental group featuring jazz legend [[Wayne Shorter]] on tenor and soprano saxophone. The group also included [[Patrice Rushen]] on keyboards, [[Alphonso Johnson]] on bass, [[Armando Peraza]] and Chepito Areas on percussion, and [[Leon "Ndugu" Chancler]] on drums. They toured briefly and received much acclaim from the music press, who compared the effort with the era of ''Caravanserai'' (1972). Santana released another solo record, ''[[Blues for Salvador]]'' (1987), which won a [[Grammy Award for Best Rock Instrumental Performance]].
Edit summary
Added more detailed to the 80s part of Santana's career with the album "Freedom" adding Buddy Miles to the name of lead singers on the album.
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